INL’s Role in Advanced Reactor Demonstration and New Modeling & Simulation Capabilities

Dr. Abou-Jaoude
SPEAKER:

Dr. Abdalla Abou-Jaoude

Advanced Reactor Research Integrator

DATE/TIME:
MON, 10/30/2023 - 3:00PM TO 4:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL

Abstract

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is at the forefront of the nation’s advanced reactor R&D effort. Advanced reactor are a promising form of baseload carbon free energy generation and several studies are expecting them to play a critical part in US decarbonization plans. The seminar presentation will be divided in two parts. The first will provide an overview of R&D activities at the lab in support of advanced reactor development efforts. The timeline for forthcoming reactor demonstrations efforts at INL and elsewhere will also be presented. The second part of the seminar will discuss the new ‘multiphysics modeling & simulation’ capabilities being developed at INL as part of the ‘MOOSE’ ecosystem. These tools are being developed primarily to model the complex physics in advanced reactors, but can also be employed to wider engineering applications. They represent a paradigm shit in multi-disciplinary engineering analysis, but enabling the tight coupling of various physical phenomena in nuclear reactors.

Bio

Dr. Abdalla Abou-Jaoude, is the Advanced Reactor Research Integrator at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). He is leading several projects across 7 Department of Energy (DOE) programs and is a recognized expert on advanced reactor technology. His main three focus areas are: (1) advanced modeling & simulation, (2) molten salt technology, and (3) nuclear technoeconomics. On modeling & simulation, Dr. Abou-Jaoude leads the National Reactor Innovation Center’s (NRIC) Virtual Test Bed (VTB), and is the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) campaign point of contact to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). On the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) side, he is the confirmatory analysis technical lead for the Molten Chloride Reactor Experiment (MCRE) to be built at INL, he manages work packages for various DOE campaigns and Integrated Research Projects (IRP) on multiphysics simulation of MSRs, and led the first ever fueled chloride salt irradiation in history. On nuclear technoeconomics, Dr. Abou-Jaoude is the activity lead for the Systems Analysis & Integration (SA&I) campaign on advanced reactor technoeconomic assessment, he manages a project for the Integrated Energy System (IES) campaign on developing advanced reactor cost data for hybrid systems, another for the Microreactor Program (MRP) on developing detailed cost estimates for microreactors, and a fourth for the Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) on creating a database of reference advanced reactor cost estimates.

Previously at INL, Abdalla has been involved in various aspect of advance reactor designs, notably for Molten Salt Reactors, Sodium Fast Reactors (namely the Versatile Test Reactor), Nuclear Space Thermal Propulsion, and heat-pipe based microreactors. He also previously supported a private-public partnership with a U.S. utility to evaluate hydrogen-cogeneration options at nuclear power plants. He graduated with a doctorate in Nuclear Engineering from Georgia Tech in 2017 and was the INL Deboisblanc Distinguished Postdoctoral Associate in 2018. He obtained a MEng in Mechanical with Nuclear Engineering from Imperial College London in 2013.

Boiling Heat Transfer Experimental Research at MIT: Accomplishments, Open Questions, and Future Directions

Dr.MatteoBucci
SPEAKER:

Dr. Matteo Bucci

Associate Professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering, MIT

DATE/TIME:
MON, 10/23/2023 - 3:00PM TO 4:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL

Abstract

In every field of science, the possibility of discovering and understanding new phenomena, or testing new hypotheses, is strongly related to and limited by the capability of observation. Here, we will discuss recent advances in experimental boiling heat transfer research made possible by unique experimental facilities and non-intrusive high-resolution optical diagnostics, e.g., high-speed infrared thermometry and phase detection techniques. We will analyze these techniques' capabilities and limitations in supporting the understanding of fundamental two phase heat transfer problems. Examples are the growth and departure of bubbles from a heated surface, the distribution of the dry area fraction, the partitioning of heat flux, and the boiling crisis. Notably, we will discuss experiments conducted in prototypical LWR conditions, presenting first-of-a-kind observations of the boiling process and the boiling crisis. The use of these diagnostics has been instrumental in providing an answer to some long-standing fundamental physical questions. However, access to these techniques is not sufficient. Nowadays, new understanding is hindered by our capability to analyze data, i.e., we can produce much more data than we can possibly analyze. This issue is critical for highly non-linear phenomena, e.g., boiling heat transfer, whose complexity is hidden beyond what a human eye can hardly see or a human brain can timely analyze. We will discuss how artificial intelligence can alleviate this issue and, possibly, enable the development of autonomous, self-learning testing capabilities.

Bio

Dr. Matteo Bucci is Associate Professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering at MIT. He has joined the MIT faculty in 2016, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in nuclear reactor engineering and design, and two- phase heat transfer. His thermal-hydraulics group at MIT focuses on two major research axes related to nuclear reactor safety and design: (1) New understanding of heat transfer mechanisms in nuclear reactors, (2) Engineered surfaces and coatings to enhance two-phase heat transfer. His group also develops and uses advanced diagnostics, such as high-speed infrared thermometry and phase-detection, and post-processing algorithms to perform unique heat transfer experiments. Matteo has published over 40 articles in the areas of two-phase flow and heat transfer,
and surface engineering technology. For his research work and his teaching, he won several awards, among which the MIT Ruth and Joel Spira Award for Excellence in Teaching (2020), ANS/PAI Outstanding Faculty Award (2018), the UIT-Fluent Award (2006), the European Nuclear Education Network Award (2010), and the 2012 ANS Thermal- Hydraulics Division Best Paper Award (2012). In 2022, Matteo received the inaugural DOE Early Career Award for Nuclear Energy. Matteo is Editor of Applied Thermal Engineering and a consultant for the nuclear industry.

Need for Speed in Scintillation Detectors

Dennis Schaart_1_s
SPEAKER:

Dennis R. Schaart, PhD
Head, Medical Physics & Technology
Delft University of Technology

DATE/TIME:
MON, 10/16/2023 - 3:00PM TO 4:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL

Abstract

Remarkable progress is being made in the development of ultrafast scintillation detectors, driven by the need for detectors with better time resolution and/or higher count rate capability in medical imaging and other applications. This talk aims to provide a brief overview of the fundamental factors that affect these performance parameters and, based on the insights gained in recent years, to outline some possible directions for further development in the fields of scintillation materials, photosensor technology, and readout electronics. While the application perspective will focus on medical imaging techniques such as time-of-flight PET and photon-counting CT, many of the topics covered will also be applicable in other domains.

Bio

Dennis R. Schaart heads the Medical Physics & Technology section at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft). He worked in academia as well as in the medical device industry, always at the intersection of physics, technology, and medicine. He started as an R&D physicist at Nucletron (now Elekta), where he developed new devices for radiotherapy. He obtained his doctoral degree (with highest honors) in 2002. He then joined TU Delft to set up a new research line on in-vivo molecular imaging technology, with special focus on ultrafast detectors for time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET). His team was among the first to explore the use of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) in TOF-PET and has published many works on the fundamentals of SiPM-based detectors and the theory of ultrafast timing. Dennis’ present research interests include novel methods and technologies for in vivo molecular imaging, anatomical imaging, and image guidance in (proton) radiotherapy. He leads the Technology for Oncology programme of the TU Delft Health Initiative and serves as a member of the R&D Program Board of the Holland Proton Therapy Centre (HollandPTC). He has (co-)authored more than 150 peer-reviewed papers and is a frequently invited speaker.

Fall 2023 Colloquium

Fall 2023 Colloquium Archive

The Berkeley Space Center

November 27, 2023

SPEAKER: Alexandre Bayen Liao-Cho Professor, EECS; Associate Provost for the Berkeley Space Center DATE/TIME: MON, 11/27/2023 – 3:00PM TO 4:00PM LOCATION: 3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL Abstract This talk will describe the …

Jennifer Shusterman

Microfluidics Separations for Field-Deployable Nuclear Forensics

November 13, 2023

SPEAKER: Jennifer Shusterman Staff Scientist, LLNL DATE/TIME: MON, 11/13/2023 – 3:00PM TO 4:00PM LOCATION: 3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL Abstract The Nuclear and Radiochemistry group at LLNL works on a wide variety …

Chemistry and physics of graphite in molten fluoride salts

November 6, 2023

SPEAKER: L Vergari Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign DATE/TIME: MON, 11/06/2023 – 3:00PM TO 4:00PM LOCATION: 3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL Abstract Graphite is a ubiquitous …

INL’s Role in Advanced Reactor Demonstration and New Modeling & Simulation Capabilities

October 30, 2023

SPEAKER: Dr. Abdalla Abou-Jaoude Advanced Reactor Research Integrator DATE/TIME: MON, 10/30/2023 – 3:00PM TO 4:00PM LOCATION: 3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL Abstract Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is at the forefront of the …

Boiling Heat Transfer Experimental Research at MIT: Accomplishments, Open Questions, and Future Directions

October 23, 2023

SPEAKER: Dr. Matteo Bucci Associate Professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering, MIT DATE/TIME: MON, 10/23/2023 – 3:00PM TO 4:00PM LOCATION: 3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL Abstract In every field of science, the …

Need for Speed in Scintillation Detectors

October 16, 2023

SPEAKER: Dennis R. Schaart, PhD Head, Medical Physics & Technology Delft University of Technology DATE/TIME: MON, 10/16/2023 – 3:00PM TO 4:00PM LOCATION: 3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL Abstract Remarkable progress is being …

Coal-to-Nuclear Repowering for a Just Transition

October 9, 2023

SPEAKER: Jessica Lovering Executive Director, Good Energy Collective DATE/TIME: MON, 10/9/2023 – 3:00PM TO 4:00PM LOCATION: 3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL Abstract This talk will focus on the intersection between policies to …

Next-generation neutrino detection with Eos

October 2, 2023

SPEAKER: Professor Gabriel O. Gann Associate Professor of Physics, UC Berkeley Faculty Scientist, LBNL DATE/TIME: MON, 10/2/2023 – 3:00PM TO 4:00PM LOCATION: 3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL Abstract Neutrinos are some of …

Kaleidos: Making Nuclear Power Portable at Radiant Nuclear

September 25, 2023

SPEAKER: Dr. Benjamin R. Betzler Head of Nuclear Engineering at Radiant DATE/TIME: MON, 09/25/2023 – 3:00PM TO 4:00PM LOCATION: 3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL Abstract Increased industry development of nuclear microreactors over …

Radioactive Mice! How We Use the Mouse Model to Study Radiotherapeutics and Decontamination at LBNL

September 18, 2023

SPEAKER: Alexia Cosby, Ph.D. DATE/TIME: MON, 09/18/2023 – 3:00PM TO 4:00PM LOCATION: 3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL Abstract The mouse model is an essential component for validating preclinical research. Here at LBNL, …

Coal-to-Nuclear Repowering for a Just Transition

Lovering1182
SPEAKER:

Jessica Lovering

Executive Director, Good Energy Collective

DATE/TIME:
MON, 10/9/2023 - 3:00PM TO 4:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL

Abstract

This talk will focus on the intersection between policies to decarbonize our energy system and efforts to ensure a just transition for fossil-fuel workers and dependent communities. One opportunity that has emerged is the potential to repower retiring coal power plants with small, modular nuclear reactors. Such projects could leverage existing infrastructure and workforce. I will explore some of first coal-to-nuclear projects underway, along with state and federal policies to aid such efforts.

Bio

Jessica Lovering is the co-founder and Executive Director of Good Energy Collective, a new organization building the progressive case for nuclear energy as an essential part of the broader climate change agenda and working to align the clean energy space with environmental justice and sustainability goals. She completed her PhD in Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. Her dissertation focused on how commercial nuclear trade affects international security standards and how very small nuclear reactors could be deployed at the community level. She is a Fellow with the Energy for Growth Hub, looking at how advanced nuclear can be deployed in sub-Saharan Africa, and a Senior Visiting Fellow with the Fastest Path to Zero Initiative at the University of Michigan.

Gamma Reality, Inc: DOE and ANS Articles Spotlight Startup Founded by Kai Vetter and UCBNE Alumni Andy Haefner and Ryan Pavlovsky

GRI Logo

Gamma Reality, Inc: DOE and ANS Articles Spotlight Startup Founded by Kai Vetter and UCBNE Alumni Andy Haefner and Ryan Pavlovsky

October 6, 2023

GRI Logo
Logo courtesy of Gamma Reality, Inc.

UCBNE alumni Andy Haefner and Ryan Pavlovsky, alongside professor Kai Vetter, have worked to develop and commercialize real-time, 3D radiation mapping instruments through their work at LBNL and startup Gamma Reality, Inc. Their scene-data fusion enabled instruments have been increasingly adopted by nuclear power plants across the US, Canada, and Switzerland.

Learn more about the creation of Gamma Reality, Inc. in the full DOE article, and the applications of its technologies in the full ANS article.

Next-generation neutrino detection with Eos

OGphoto
SPEAKER:

Professor Gabriel O. Gann

Associate Professor of Physics, UC Berkeley

Faculty Scientist, LBNL

DATE/TIME:
MON, 10/2/2023 - 3:00PM TO 4:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL

Abstract

Neutrinos are some of the most fascinating particles that occur in nature. Over one billion times lighter than the proton, the neutrino was once thought to be massless and to travel at the speed of light. This talk will discuss the ways in which neutrinos can offer insights into the world around us, and present recent technological advances that enable a new kind of “hybrid" neutrino experiment, which would combine two highly successful detection techniques: the topological information of Cherenkov detectors, with the high light yield of scintillators. A technical demonstrator for this technology is currently being deployed in the Nuclear Engineering department, and the status and plans for this project will be presented.

Bio

Prof. Orebi Gann joined the UC Berkeley Physics department faculty in January 2012, with a joint appointment in the Nuclear Science Division at LBNL. She completed her postdoctoral research at University of Pennsylvania from 2008-2011, having graduated with a DPhil from University of Oxford in 2008. Prof. Orebi Gann leads the proto-collaboration pursuing Theia, a large-scale realization of the technology being tested in Eos.