Low Energy Nuclear Physics Research at LLNL

SPEAKER:
PROF. DR. J.T. BURKE

NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE PHYSICS GROUP

NUCLEAR AND CHEMICAL SCIENCES DIVISION

LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY

DATE/TIME:
MON, 02/23/2015 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Spring 2015 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

The low energy nuclear physics program at LLNL consists of a myriad of accelerator based and table top experiments. Studies include nuclear structure, neutron induced cross section measurements, determination of cross sections using the surrogate reaction technique, nuclear-atomic plasma induced interactions and beta decay studies. In this seminar, I will provide an overview of our low energy nuclear physics research program at LLNL. These include efforts at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Hyperion, Hydra and NeutronSTAR detector systems will also be discussed in detail.

Instigating a Nuclear Cost Culture

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SPEAKER:
RODNEY M. ADAMS, M.S.

PUBLISHER, ATOMIC INSIGHTS
HOST, THE ATOMIC SHOW

DATE/TIME:
MON, 02/09/2015 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Spring 2015 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

The nuclear industry has a long history of avoiding the topic of effectively controlling costs when designing structures, systems and components and when devising operational concepts. This history is rooted in a variety of assumptions, in a long period of bad habits learned as a national security related endeavor, and in a habitual defensive mode with regard to public relations.

The topic is too important to be left in the shadows. Cost control should not be a subject that is whispered about by new entrants into the field only to be shushed by more experienced professionals as a topic that cannot be seriously discussed. Regulators must be reminded that their job is to protect public health and safety -- not from radiation, but with the help of radiation and nuclear energy. The industry leaders need to explain that cost control does not mean cutting corners on safety or security; in fact, a proper emphasis on cost effectiveness can enhance both safety and security.

 

About the Speaker:

Rod Adams graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1981 with a BS in English. He was accepted into the nuclear power community by Admiral Rickover. He served on USS Stonewall Jackson as a junior officer in a variety of billets and then as the Engineer Officer of the USS Von Steuben.  After 12 years of naval service he resigned his active duty commission, entered the Naval Reserves and founded Adams Atomic Engines, Inc. In 1999, after 6 years of entrepreneurial activity, he was recalled to active duty and served until his retirement as a Commander in 2010. During his second active duty period, he gained experience as a teacher, financial analyst, maintenance analyst, headquarters staff officer, and program manager. He is now the publisher of Atomic Insights and the host of the Atomic Show podcast.

Consortium for Verification Technology

Pozzi-photo
SPEAKER:
DR. SARA POZZI

DIRECTOR, DETECTION FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION GROUP

DEPARTMENT OF NUCLEAR ENGINEERING AND RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

DATE/TIME:
MON, 02/02/2015 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Spring 2015 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

The Consortium for Verification Technology (CVT), consists of thirteen leading universities and nine national laboratories, working together to provide the research and development and human capital needed to address technology and policy issues in treaty-compliance monitoring. The underlying issues include nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards in support of the mission of the NNSA’s Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development office. In this presentation, I will describe the major gaps and emerging challenges in treaty verification that the CVT will address in six thrust areas: (i) treaty verification: characterizing existing gaps and emerging challenges, (ii) fundamental data and techniques, (iii) advanced safeguards tools for accessible facilities, (iv) detection of undeclared activities and inaccessible facilities, (v) disarmament verification, and (vi) education and outreach.

Over the next five years, the CVT will deliver new instruments and methods for nuclear nonproliferation, safeguards, and arms control treaty verification. We will educate more than 60 Bachelors, Masters, and Ph. D. students with the talent, training, and commitment to meet the current and emerging challenges in this field. These graduates will have strong ties to the national laboratory system thanks to the collaborative research projects in which they will be engaged.

About the Speaker:

Professor Sara Pozzi earned her M.S. and Ph.D. in nuclear engineering at the Polytechnic of Milan, Italy in 1997 and 2001, respectively.  Following her doctorate, she spent six years as a staff scientist at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), where she most recently held the position of Senior Staff. In 2007, she joined the Department of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences at the University of Michigan where she established and is the leader of the Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Group (DNNG). Her research interests include the development of new methods for nuclear materials detection, identification, and characterization for nuclear nonproliferation, nuclear material control and accountability, nuclear safeguards, and national security programs.

Prof. Pozzi is the director of the Consortium for Verification Technology, a consortium of 13 universities and 9 national laboratories dedicated to the development of new technologies for nuclear treaty verification. She is the co-author of the Monte Carlo code MCNPX-PoliMi, which is being used at over 50 institutions world-wide. Her publication record includes over 300 papers in journals and international conference proceedings. She was invited to give over 50 seminars, both nationally and internationally. As the DNNG leader, she advises 14 doctoral students and many undergraduate students, and is the faculty advisor for the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) student chapter.

She is the recipient of many awards, including the 2006 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Early Career Award, 2006 Department of Energy, Office of Science, Outstanding Mentor Award, 2009 INMM Central Region Chapter, Special Service Award, 2012 INMM Edway R. Johnson Meritorious Service Award, and 2012 UM Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences Department, Outstanding Achievement Award.

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