Hadron Therapy–Current Progress and Research Issues

blakely
SPEAKER:
DR. ELEANOR A. BLAKELY

LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

DATE/TIME:
MON, 11/26/2018 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Fall 2018 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

Hadron radiotherapy for cancer treatment with protons or carbon ions was originally developed at the Berkeley Laboratory. Today the United States has more than 25 proton treatment facilities nation wide, but no carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) facility. Currently, approximately 20,000 cancer patients worldwide have received CIRT, primarily in Asia and in Europe. This presentation will describe the progress made in this field, and the research and societal issues that still must be addressed.

About the Speaker:

Eleanor A. Blakely is a graduate of the University of San Diego, San Diego, CA (B.A. Biology with Chemistry minor), and the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (M.S. Biophysics and Ph.D. Physiology) as a U.S. Atomic Energy Commission Special Fellow in Radiation Science and Protection. She has spent her entire professional career at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) where she is a Senior Staff Biophysicist with more than 44 y of professional experience in molecular, cellular and animal radiobiological research directed at studying the basic mechanisms of radiation responses, with an emphasis on charged particle radiation effects. She also holds a Faculty Affiliate Appointment in the Department of Radiological Health Sciences at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado and is a Clinical Professor of Radiation Medicine (nontenured) at Loma Linda University, School of Medicine, Loma Linda, California. Her professional activities have included service on advisory panels for several hospitals, universities, and numerous federal agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DOD). In June, 2015 she retired after 40 years at LBNL, but was rehired by LBNL in October 2015, and continues to work part-time. In 2015 she received the Berkeley Laboratory Director’s Award for Exceptional Achievement: the Berkeley Lab Citation Award. Dr. Blakely is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a recipient of the Distinguished Service Award of the Radiation Research Society, and a Distinguished Emeritus Member of the NCRP.

Laser-driven Pulsed Neutron Sources as a potential Pool-side Characterization Tool for Nuclear Fuels

Portrait
SPEAKER:
SVEN C. VOGEL

TECHNICAL STAFF

MATERIALS SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION

LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

DATE/TIME:
MON, 11/19/2018 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Fall 2018 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

The unique advantages of neutrons for characterization of nuclear fuel materials are applied at the pulsed spallation neutron source at LANSCE to accelerate the development and ultimately licensing of new nuclear fuel forms. Neutrons allow to characterize the crystallography of phases consisting of heavy elements (e.g. uranium) and light elements (e.g. oxygen, nitrogen, or silicon). The penetration ability in combination with comparably large (e.g. cm sized) beam spots provide microstructural characterization of typical fuel geometries for phase composition, strains, and textures from neutron diffraction.

In parallel, we are developing energy-resolved neutron imaging and tomography with which we can complement diffraction characterization. This unique approach not only allows to visualize cracks, arrangement of fuel pellets in rodlets etc., but also characterization of isotope or element densities by means of neutron absorption resonance analysis.

Laser-driven pulsed neutron sources have the potential to provide these capabilities “pool-side”, e.g. at the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. Compared to proton accelerator driven spallation sources, requiring investments exceeding $1B, the investment cost for a laser-driven neutron source would be of the order of several $10M with the potential of similar flux to that of a smaller, earlier generation spallation neutron source. Compared to electron accelerator-driven neutron sources, the flux of a laser-driven source would be at least one order of magnitude higher. Compared to reactor neutron sources, the pulse structure of the laser-driven neutron source would enable unique characterization not possible with steady-state reactor neutrons.

In this presentation, we provide an overview of our recent accomplishments in fuel characterization for accident-tolerant fuel consisting of uranium nitride/uranium silicide composite fuels as well as metallic fuels. We will further discuss recent results demonstrating the use of laser-driven neutron sources for these efforts.

NE Student Sarah Stevenson Featured in Idaho National Laboratory Article

NE Student Sarah Stevenson Featured in Idaho National Laboratory Article

Sarah Stevenson, a PhD student, was featured this April in an article highlighting her worldly travels in pursuit of nuclear materials research: click here to view article.

sarah

Exerpt from the article:

Uncle Sam may have to wait a few years for Sarah Stevenson, but it’s a solid bet the wait will be worth it.

When she graduates from Kansas State University in May, Stevenson, who spent the summer of 2016 as an intern at Idaho National Laboratory, will have a commission in the U.S. Air Force as a second lieutenant. This comes from being an ROTC cadet for five years, but Stevenson learned in March she had received a Chancellor’s Fellowship from the University of California, Berkeley (UCB). This will help her pursue a doctorate studying nuclear materials at UCB’s Nuclear Engineering Department. UCB joined the Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) network in 2011.

The plan is for Stevenson, 22, to commission in the Air Force, using an “education delay” to postpone entry to extended active duty while she studies at Berkeley. Once her Ph.D. is in hand, she will become a physicist/nuclear engineer for the Air Force.


 

NE Advisory Board Member Rita Baranwal, nominated for Assistant Secretary of Energy at the Department of Energy

NE Advisory Board Member Rita Baranwal, nominated for Assistant Secretary of Energy at the Department of Energy

FRIDAY, NOV 9TH 2018

rita

Rita Baranwal has been nominated to be an Assistant Secretary of Energy at the Department of Energy. As Assistant Secretary of Energy, if confirmed by the Senate, Ms Baranwal will be heading the powerful Office of Nuclear Energy. She would also be responsible for the department's nuclear technology research and the development and management of the department's nuclear technology infrastructure. Full Article.

 

NSSC Director and UCB NE Professor Jasmina Vujic elected ANS Fellow

NSSC Director and UCB NE Professor Jasmina Vujic elected ANS Fellow

FRIDAY, NOV 9TH 2018

Vujic_0

Congratulations to our very own Prof. Jasmina Vujic, for her election to the highest rank of Fellow within the American Nuclear Society (ANS). ANS recognizes Prof. Vujic’s contributions to the advancement of nuclear science and technology. Professor Vujic will be officially recognized at the ANS Winter Meeting.

Production of the Transplutonium Elements

SusanHogle
SPEAKER:
SUSAN HOGLE

NUCLEAR ENGINEER

DATE/TIME:
MON, 11/05/2018 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Fall 2018 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

 The transplutonium elements were discovered beginning in the 1940s and 50s, with many synthesized for the first time at UC Berkeley. Since that time, large scale reactor production programs have taken place at the Savannah River Site, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, amongst others. Production and isolation of the transplutonium elements present many unique challenges, including high radiotoxicity, short half-lives, poor nuclear data, and significant heat production. These challenges, and the research underway to address them, will be discussed during this talk, as well as ongoing and potential future applications of various transplutonium isotopes.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Susan Hogle received her PhD in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Tennessee in 2012, and her Bachelors of Applied Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Toronto in 2004. Dr. Hogle currently works at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory where her primary area of research is in the reactor production of isotopes, in particular actinides such as 229Th, 249Bk, and 252Cf. Additional areas of research include optimization and evolutionary modeling, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for depletion, and integral cross-section measurements.

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