Development of CD46 targeted theranostics for imaging and treatment of cancer

AT Mt Zion
SPEAKER:
DR. Robert Flavell
Associate Professor
Section Chief, Molecular Imaging and Therapeutics
Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, and Pharmaceutical Chemistry
University of California, San Francisco
DATE/TIME:
FRI, 09/24/2018 - 3:00PM TO 4:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Fall 2021 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

The development of novel molecular imaging and radionuclide treatments is changing the standard of care in patients with cancer. CD46 is an underexplored therapeutic target which is highly expressed in many cancers, in a lineage independent fashion. We have developed paired imaging and therapeutic agents, 89Zr-DFO-YS5, and 225Ac-DOTA-YS5, which are highly effective for detection and treatment of prostate cancer and multiple myeloma. These agents are highly effective in preclinical models and have strong promise for near-term clinical translation.

About the Speaker:

Robert Flavell, MD, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Section of Molecular Imaging in the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at the University of California, San Francisco. He received his medical degree from Weill Cornell Medical College, and his PhD from the Rockefeller University as part of the Tri-Institutional MD PhD program. He completed his one-year internship at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Dr. Flavell completed a four-year diagnostic radiology residency at the University of California, San Francisco, where he also finished a Nuclear Medicine fellowship. In June 2016. he joined the faculty at UCSF as an Assistant Professor in Residence. Since 2019, he has been the Chief of the Division of Molecular Imaging and Therapeutics (formerly nuclear medicine), in the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging. Dr. Flavell’s laboratory focuses on the development of new molecular imaging and therapeutic tools for better detection and treatment of prostate and other cancers.

Three UCBNE Alumni Receive NSSC Awards

Three UCBNE Alumni Receive NSSC Awards

September 3rd, 2021

From Left to Right: Hi Vo, Kelly Kmak, Mark Straub
From Left to Right: Hi Vo, Kelly Kmak, Mark Straub

Three UCBNE alumni have been awarded the 2021 Nuclear Science and Security Consortium's Awards for Outstanding Publication and Outstanding Thesis.

Mark Straub (PhD in Chemistry awarded May 14, 2021) won for Best Reviewed Publication with "Recent Advances in Nuclear Forensic Chemistry", which was featured as a cover article in a special issue of Analytical Chemistry. Read more about this article here.

Kelly Kmak (PhD awarded May 14, 2021) won for Outstanding Thesis for Radiochemistry and Forensics with “Investigation of the 230Th(p,2n)229Pa Reaction as a Route to 225Ac”.

Hi Vo (PhD awarded May 14, 2021) won for Outstanding Thesis for Nuclear Engineering with “Influence of Defects’ Mechanical Stability on Microscale Plasticity and Failure”.

The NSSC Outstanding Publication Award is awarded annually by the Nuclear Science and Security Consortium to the lead author(s) of an outstanding peer-reviewed paper published in the areas of basic and applied science and engineering supporting the nation’s nuclear security and nonproliferation mission.

The NSSC Outstanding Thesis Award is awarded annually by the Nuclear Science and Security Consortium to scholars who have completed an exceptional thesis in the areas of basic and applied science and engineering supporting the nation’s nuclear security and nonproliferation mission.

These highly competitive awards honor NSSC Fellows and Affiliates for their excellent contributions to nuclear security science.

RadWatch & DoseNet: building scientific literacy through a network of radiation and environmental sensors

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SPEAKER:
Ali Hanks

Lecturer and Assistant Project Scientist in Nuclear Engineering

University of California, Berkeley

DATE/TIME:
FRI, 09/10/2021 - 3:00PM TO 4:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Fall 2021 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

The 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident serves as an example of the risks associated with energy technologies and the need to minimize physical as well as psychological effects on local and global communities. We have established the RadWatch and DoseNet community outreach programs to enhance the public understanding of risks associated with radiation exposure. The RadWatch program works to provide transparent, relevant measurements of radioactivity in our environment through measurements of locally sourced fish and produce. The ongoing monitoring of radiation in our environment provides the public with a clear baseline for what is “normal”. This work has since been expanded to include the use of neutron activation analyses to determine the concentrations of heavy metals in such samples, further contextualizing previous radiological measurements and our environmental impact. Similarly, the DoseNet project was developed to bring radiation and environmental data into classrooms and connect directly with students. DoseNet is a network of radiation and environmental sensors connecting schools in the Bay Area, Japan, and around the world. The DoseNet program has used this network to recruit a handful of high school students each summer as interns. These programs represent parts of a multidisciplinary undertaking to educate the next generation about radiation science, improve scientific literacy, and improve our communication of technical concepts to our communities.

About the Speaker:

Ali Hanks is a Lecturer and Project Scientist in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research is focused on advancements in radiation detection and imaging technologies. As head of the RadWatch and DoseNet outreach programs, a large part of her work focused on the applications of advanced radiation detection technologies towards public education and outreach. Dr. Hanks received her Ph.D. in High Energy Nuclear Physics from Columbia University as part of the PHENIX collaboration. She spent 4 years as a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stony Brook University, and then at UC Berkeley where she had a joint Postdoctoral position in the Physics and Nuclear Engineering departments. She has been an Assistant Project Scientist in the Department of Nuclear Engineering since 2017, and has worked as a Lecturer the last three years teaching a new course she designed based on her work with students in the DoseNet program.

Nuclear Engineering Opportunities at Los Alamos National Laboratory

Dr.Sarraos
SPEAKER:
Dr. John Sarrao
Deputy Director
Los Alamos National Laboratory
DATE/TIME:
FRI, 09/03/2021 - 3:00PM TO 4:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Fall 2021 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

Los Alamos’ partnership with UC Berkeley pre-dates the start of the Manhattan Project and continues robustly today. Nevertheless, the National Labs in general, and Los Alamos in particular, are relatively unknown to many students (and faculty) in academia. This presentation provides an overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By highlighting LANL’s strategic priorities and mission needs, we hope to foster further collaborations and enhance pipeline opportunities between Los Alamos and UC Berkeley, especially for nuclear engineers

About the speaker:John Sarrao is the Deputy Laboratory Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (DDSTE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He leads the Laboratory’s mission and enabling science, technology, and engineering capabilities. John stewards LANL’s Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) program and other institutional capability initiatives, including the Laboratory’s student and post-doc programs. He also serves as LANL’s Chief Research Officer. John is an experimental condensed matter physicist. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the winner of the Department of Energy’s E.O. Lawrence Award and the Los Alamos Fellows Prize for Research, in part for the discovery of the first plutonium superconductor. John has been heavily involved in strategic planning and direction setting for materials research within the Department of Energy’s Office of Science and as a member of the National Academies of Sciences’ most recent decadal survey of materials research. John received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Los Angeles based on thesis work performed at LANL.