ENDF/B-VIII.0

DavidBrown
SPEAKER:
DR. DAVID BROWN

SCIENTIST (S4)

DATE/TIME:
MON, 09/24/2018 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Fall 2018 Colloquium Series
Abstract:
The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) released the ENDF/B-VIII.0 evaluated nuclear reaction data library on February 2, 2018. ENDF/B-VIII.0 incorporates many improvements including a nearly completely new thermal neutron scattering sublibrary, the new IAEA standards, and the CIELO project evaluations for neutron reactions on 16O, 56Fe, 235U, 238U and 239Pu. These evaluations are a direct result of improvements in theory and simulation and benefit from recent experimental data obtained in the U.S. and Europe.  In this talk, I will highlight the most important changes in ENDF/B-VIII.0 that impact reactor and shielding applications.
About the Speaker:

Dr. David Brown is a senior scientist at the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory.  Dr. Brown is the ENDF Library Manager, coordinated the release of the ENDF/B-VIII.0 library in Feb. 2018 and developed the ADVANCE continuous integration system for nuclear data quality assurance.  Dr. Brown’s current research focuses on elastic and inelastic scattering at the interfaces between the resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast energy regions in structural materials.  He is active in several NEA Working Parties on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) including EG-GNDS which coordinates the GNDS format (the format to succeed the ENDF-6 format).  Before moving to BNL, Dr. Brown was a staff scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where he led the ENDL nuclear data library effort and began his work as a co-developer of the FUDGE nuclear data processing system.  Dr. Brown is a trained high energy nuclear physicist who has dabbled in non-equilibrium quantum field theory and the use of entangled hadron pairs to image nuclear reaction zones at the RHIC and LHC.

University of California, Berkeley ranks 3rd on College Magazine’s “Top 10 Colleges for Engineering Majors”

University of California, Berkeley ranks 3rd on College Magazine's "Top 10 Colleges for Engineering Majors"

September 24, 2018

In an article released on August 9, 2018 on collegemagazine.com,UC Berkeley ranks 3rd nationwide on the list of "top 10 colleges for engineering majors that will have you rebuilding the world in no time."

The article boasts UC Berkeley's five (5) Engineering Buildings, including the massive Bechtel Engineering Center which "houses computers and rooms for students to rent out to work on research like robotic exoskeletons for the disabled or molecular surgery to improve cancer outcomes." Also the University's "prominent research in the computer engineering and science field" mentioning the Agile Design of Efficient Processing Technologies (ADEPT) projectand Data-X Lab.

A video from 2013 is also displayed, introducing many UCB Engineering students including 1 of our very own Sasha Asgnari who at the time of the video release was a 1st Year Nuclear Engineering Ph.D. Student. The video lists their testimonies about what make UCB Engineering one of the best.

Check out the original article here: https://www.collegemagazine.com/top-10-colleges-engineering-majors/

The Swelling Equation is a Four Dimensional Animal

Michael Fluss
SPEAKER:
MICHAEL FLUSS

VISITING SCIENTIST UCB-NE

DATE/TIME:
MON, 09/17/2018 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Fall 2018 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

Nuclear Energy Material Scientists have been searching for the bias driven swelling equation for over 50 years. While the theoretical basis for the swelling equation was described 45 years ago utilizing mean-field (rate) theory, the animal itself has managed to hide from experimentalists.  Foster and Flinn attempted to trap the animal but were only able to capture an empirical version of the beast.  About 10 years ago Kalchenko and co-workers set out to track the beast by following its swelling curve as a function of dpa-rate—and they found it—an experimental method fully consistent with rate theory that allows for a swelling equation valid from 10**-2 to 10**-8 dpa/s. Full domestication of the beast remains a challenge.

About the Speaker:

Michael Fluss holds a B.S. from Rutgers University and a PhD in Nuclear Chemistry from Columbia University.  His career spans experimental research in nuclear reaction physics, dosimetry, radiation damage in semiconductors and metals, and solid-state physics.  Currently he is a visiting scientist in the Nuclear Energy Department at Berkeley with a focus on accelerated testing of nuclear materials and the fundamental aspects of non-equilibrium radiation environments.

Translating high-resolution radiation detection technology to head-and-neck imaging (design, instrumentation, and performance)

ShivaAbbaszadeh
SPEAKER:
SHIVA ABBASZADEH

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN, DEPARTMENT OF NUCLEAR, PLASMA, AND RADIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
DATE/TIME:
MON, 09/10/2018 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Fall 2018 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

Current head and neck cancer diagnosis and treatment planning suffers from poor spatial resolution of whole-body positron emission tomography (WB-PET) scans. In the neck, where tissue layers are thin, the spatial resolution of WB-PET (4-6 mm) is not sufficient to evaluate small lymph nodes (<5 mm), establish how far the tumor has invaded locally, and guide the decision to resect a tumor rather than irradiate and deliver chemotherapy. In this talk I will introduce PET imaging and discuss how to address this problem by translating high-resolution radiation detection technology to head and neck imaging. Then I will discuss the development of a PET system based on cadmium zinc telluride detector technology. System characterization and methods to improve sensitivity will also be discussed.

About the Speaker:

Shiva Abbaszadeh is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) in the Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering. She was previously a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University and received her PhD in ECE at the University of Waterloo (Ontario, Canada). Her research interests include radiation detection and instrumentation for molecular imaging, computational problem solving, and quantitative characterization of biological processes. Shiva is a member of IEEE and SPIE and has received a number of awards for her work on medical imaging technology (Mitacs Elevate Fellowship, SPIE Optics and Photonics Education Scholarship, and the NIH-sponsored Stanford SMIS T32 award).

NE Doctoral Candidate Receives Award for Nuclear Engineering Software

NE Doctoral Candidate Receives Award for Nuclear Engineering Software

September 6th, 2018

novak_April-novak_Courtesy

Campus doctoral candidate in nuclear engineering April Novak placed first in the advanced reactor systems category at the annual Innovations in Nuclear Technology R&D Awards in April.

Novak’s paper, “Pronghorn: A Porous Media Thermal-Hydraulics Core Simulator and its Validation with SANA experiments,” was presented at the International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants in April, according to a press release.

“I’m grateful to be able to share what I’m working on and get more people involved in the field of nuclear engineering as a whole or in the design of pebble-reactors,” Novak said.

The paper focused on pebble-bed reactors, which differ from conventional nuclear reactors. Most reactors use long and skinny reactor cores with uranium-oxide as fuel, according to Novak. Pebble-bed reactors, on the other hand, use tennis ball-sized pebbles that consist of uranium kernels, surrounded by layers of silicon carbide and pyrolytic carbon, in a mixture of graphite.

To read more about April's accomplishment, please go to: http://www.dailycal.org/2018/09/03/campus-graduate-student-receives-awar...

Congratulations, April!

4153 Etcheverry Hall, MC 1730 (map) University of California
Berkeley, California 94720
510-642-4077

Student Services
agill@berkeley.edu
510-642-5760