Development of CD46 targeted theranostics for imaging and treatment of cancer

AT Mt Zion
SPEAKER:
DR. Robert Flavell
Associate Professor
Section Chief, Molecular Imaging and Therapeutics
Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, and Pharmaceutical Chemistry
University of California, San Francisco
DATE/TIME:
FRI, 09/24/2018 - 3:00PM TO 4:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Fall 2021 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

The development of novel molecular imaging and radionuclide treatments is changing the standard of care in patients with cancer. CD46 is an underexplored therapeutic target which is highly expressed in many cancers, in a lineage independent fashion. We have developed paired imaging and therapeutic agents, 89Zr-DFO-YS5, and 225Ac-DOTA-YS5, which are highly effective for detection and treatment of prostate cancer and multiple myeloma. These agents are highly effective in preclinical models and have strong promise for near-term clinical translation.

About the Speaker:

Robert Flavell, MD, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Section of Molecular Imaging in the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at the University of California, San Francisco. He received his medical degree from Weill Cornell Medical College, and his PhD from the Rockefeller University as part of the Tri-Institutional MD PhD program. He completed his one-year internship at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Dr. Flavell completed a four-year diagnostic radiology residency at the University of California, San Francisco, where he also finished a Nuclear Medicine fellowship. In June 2016. he joined the faculty at UCSF as an Assistant Professor in Residence. Since 2019, he has been the Chief of the Division of Molecular Imaging and Therapeutics (formerly nuclear medicine), in the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging. Dr. Flavell’s laboratory focuses on the development of new molecular imaging and therapeutic tools for better detection and treatment of prostate and other cancers.

Nuclear Engineering Opportunities at Los Alamos National Laboratory

Dr.Sarraos
SPEAKER:
Dr. John Sarrao
Deputy Director
Los Alamos National Laboratory
DATE/TIME:
FRI, 09/03/2021 - 3:00PM TO 4:00PM
LOCATION:
3105 ETCHEVERRY HALL
Fall 2021 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

Los Alamos’ partnership with UC Berkeley pre-dates the start of the Manhattan Project and continues robustly today. Nevertheless, the National Labs in general, and Los Alamos in particular, are relatively unknown to many students (and faculty) in academia. This presentation provides an overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By highlighting LANL’s strategic priorities and mission needs, we hope to foster further collaborations and enhance pipeline opportunities between Los Alamos and UC Berkeley, especially for nuclear engineers

About the speaker:John Sarrao is the Deputy Laboratory Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (DDSTE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He leads the Laboratory’s mission and enabling science, technology, and engineering capabilities. John stewards LANL’s Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) program and other institutional capability initiatives, including the Laboratory’s student and post-doc programs. He also serves as LANL’s Chief Research Officer. John is an experimental condensed matter physicist. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the winner of the Department of Energy’s E.O. Lawrence Award and the Los Alamos Fellows Prize for Research, in part for the discovery of the first plutonium superconductor. John has been heavily involved in strategic planning and direction setting for materials research within the Department of Energy’s Office of Science and as a member of the National Academies of Sciences’ most recent decadal survey of materials research. John received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Los Angeles based on thesis work performed at LANL.

 

Cesium by the Ocean: Improving the analysis of environmental samples from the Fukushima Province

RalphSudowe
SPEAKER:

Ralf Sudowe

Professor of Radiochemistry & Health Physics

Colorado State University

DATE/TIME:
FRI, 08/27/2021 - 3:00PM TO 4:00PM
LOCATION:
 zoom
Fall 2021 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

The goal of radioanalytical chemistry is to identify and quantify radioisotopes present in a variety of samples. It combines advanced radiochemical separations with state-of-the art radiation detection techniques and provides information on the origin, speciation, and mobility of the material. It plays an important role in evaluating its impact on humans and the environment. The analysis of air, water, soil, and bioassay samples builds the foundation of operational environmental monitoring. However, the need for improved sample analysis methods became also apparent in the aftermath of the reactor accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. The elevated salinity of sea and ocean water results in a complex matrix that hinders the isolation, characterization, and determination of the radioisotopes of interest. This presentation will discuss recent research aimed at developing analytical techniques for such challenging types of samples and give examples of their application.

About the Speaker:

Ralf Sudowe is Professor of Radiochemistry & Health Physics in the Department of Environmental & Radiological Health Sciences at Colorado State University. His research focuses on the development and optimization of advanced radiochemical separations for environmental monitoring, emergency response, nuclear forensics, nuclear safeguards, and isotope production. Dr. Sudowe received a M.S. in Chemistry and a Ph.D. in Nuclear Chemistry from the Philipps-University Marburg in Germany. He spent two years as Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow in the Nuclear Science Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and worked several years as a staff scientist in the Nuclear Science and Chemical Sciences Division at LBNL. From 2006 to 2016, Dr. Sudowe was a faculty member in the Department of Health Physics & Diagnostic Sciences at University of Nevada Las Vegas, where he held positions as Assistant & Associate Professor.