ARG-US Remote Monitoring Systems for Packagings of Nuclear and Other Radioactive Materials

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SPEAKER:
Yung Liu
Senior Nuclear Engineer and Manager Packaging Certification & Life Cycle Management Program
Decision and Infrastructure Sciences Division
Argonne National Laboratory
DATE/TIME:
MON, 10/19/2020 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
Fall 2020 Colloquium Series

Abstract:

In this talk, I will describe the ARG-US (meaning watchful guardian) remote monitoring systems technology developed by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy Packaging Certification Program, Office of Packaging and Transportation, Office of Environmental Management. Over the past 12 years, Argonne has developed, demonstrated, and deployed two patented technology systems: the smart drum technology and the remote area modular monitoring (RAMM)/TRAVELER, with the goal of enhancing the safety, security, and safeguards (3S) of packaging containing nuclear and other radioactive materials, including spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste during storage, transportation and disposal. Highlights are provided for selected use cases of ARG-US remote monitoring systems in critical facilities, tracking and monitoring nuclear cargos during vehicle and rail shipments, geo-fencing and transport security plan, and a brief discussion of future directions.

About the Speaker:

Yung Y. Liu, ScD, Nuclear Engineering, MIT, is Senior Nuclear Engineer and Manager of the Packaging Certification and Life Cycle Management Group, Decision & Infrastructure Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory. He is responsible for managing a portfolio of research and development programs supported by the US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) programs with industry, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Japan. He interacts frequently with staff at government agencies, industries, other national laboratories, and the IAEA on technical and regulatory issues related to the safety, security, and safeguards of nuclear and other radioactive hazardous materials, including spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. Dr. Liu has over 35 years of experience as principal investigator, theorist, experimenter, innovator, educator, and manager of various materials and engineering programs related to nuclear fission, fusion, and advanced fossil energy systems. More recently in the last decade, he has been leading the development and applications of the patented ARG-US (“The Watchful Guardian”) radiofrequency identification (RFID)/CommBox, Remote Area Modular Monitoring (RAMM)/TRAVELER systems technology for tracking and monitoring high-risk and high-value materials during storage and transportation, as well as in aging management and application of advanced surveillance technology for extended storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel.

Restoring connection: evolution of engineered cover designs for abandoned legacy waste with respect to Indigenous People

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SPEAKER:
Dr. Carrie Nuva Joseph (Hopi)
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Center for Indigenous Environmental Health Research
University of Arizona (UA)
DATE/TIME:
MON, 10/12/2020 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
Fall 2020 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

The US EPA estimates there are approximately 15,000 defense-related abandoned uranium mines located in 14 states with an estimated 75% on federal and tribal land. Of those locations, over 500 abandoned mines and 1100 features are in the Four-Corners region. Uranium mill tailings, often referred to as legacy waste, comprise the largest volume of any category of radioactive waste in the Nation. Within the Department of Energy- Legacy Management significant investment is being made to understand the latest science and technology to improve the long-term management strategies for uranium mill tailings sites; however, what often gets left at the hindsight is how land disturbance as a result of extraction has unjustly positioned Indigenous People to respond to the unique challenges this presents in their communities. The research presented in this talk will 1) briefly discuss the historical implications of nuclear defense industries on Indigenous People, 2) the science and engineering behind the evolution of disposal cover designs for sites managed by the Department of Energy, and 3) how community-driven research is being used to address environmental and human exposure concerns in a community located within a region of where extensive uranium mining and milling took place. 

About the Speaker:

Dr. Carrie Nuva Joseph (Hopi) is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the Center for Indigenous Environmental Health Research at the University of Arizona (UA). She received her Ph.D. from UA’s Department of Soil, Water, and Environmental Science. She specializes in the chemical and biogeophysical relationships between natural and engineered landscapes impacted by hazardous waste and human disturbance. Her interdisciplinary efforts also include research on climate change impacts, human exposures to anthropogenic contaminants, hydrology, and water resource management in Indigenous communities.  Using a holistic lens, Dr. Joseph’s work informs decision-making in science and policy, to advance social equity and data sovereignty efforts in marginalized populations. Dr. Joseph is a recipient of numerous honors and award including her previous department’s 2019 Outstanding Dissertation Award and the National Congress of American Indian’s 40 under 40 in Indian CountryCarrie is a citizen of the Hopi Nation, where she was born and raised. She is of the Coyote clan and child of the Snow clan from the Village of Moencopi.

Rapid Nuclear Materials Discovery Through Innovative Approaches to Characterization

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SPEAKER:
Kevin Field
Associate Professor
Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences
University of Michigan
DATE/TIME:
MON, 10/02/2020 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
Fall 2020 Colloquium Series

Abstract:

Materials can play a pivotal role in advancing the state of nuclear energy both domestically and abroad by increasing safety, efficiency, and operational lifetime. Until recently, most advances in materials design for nuclear energy have been incremental – slight changes of composition here or tweaks in microstructure there. This talk will focus on research directions to enable rapid breakthroughs in the development of advanced steels by exploiting innovative approaches to shorten the time associated with characterization and analysis in post irradiation examination efforts. Specifically, recent results on the use of shielded magnetic small angle neutron scattering (SM-SANS) for replacing (or supplementing) APT characterization efforts of nanoscale precipitates in irradiated cladding will be discussed. The presentation will progress towards a discussion regarding a coupled framework for automated dislocation loop detection and analysis based upon on-zone Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) dislocation imaging with deep learning-based feature detection and tracking algorithms. Both efforts will be cast towards how the techniques enabled accelerated decision making on alloy concentration selections for FeCrAl alloys in Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) nuclear fuel cladding. The presentation will conclude on how these high throughput characterization strategies are being applied for new alloy classes and designs including novel alloy microstructures enabled through additive manufacturing techniques.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Kevin Field is an Associate Professor in the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences at the University of Michigan where his research specializes in alloy development and radiation effects in ferrous and non-ferrous alloys. His active research interests include advanced electron microscopy and scattering-based characterization techniques, additive/advanced manufacturing for nuclear materials, and the application of machine/deep learning techniques for advanced innovation in characterization and development of material systems. Prof. Field moved to the University of Michigan in the Fall of 2019 after six years at Oak Ridge National Laboratory t. Prof. Field has presented and published numerous manuscripts on radiation effects in various material systems relevant for nuclear power generation including irradiated concrete performance, deformation mechanisms in irradiated steels, and radiation tolerance of enhanced accident tolerant fuel forms. Dr. Field received his B.S. (2007) from Michigan Technological University in Materials Science & Engineering and his M.S. (2009) and Ph.D. (2012) from the University of Wisconsin – Madison in Materials Science with a focus on segregation phenomena in ion and neutron irradiated ferrous-based alloys. Dr. Field’s work has been recognized through several avenues including receiving the prestigious Alvin M. Weinberg Fellowship from ORNL in 2013 and being awarded the UT-Battelle Award for Early Career Researcher in Science and Technology in 2018 and Department of Energy Early Career Award in 2020.

Machine Learning approach to Nuclear Threat Detection

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SPEAKER:
SIMON LABOV
DATE/TIME:
MON, 09/28/2020 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
Via Zoom
Fall 2020 Colloquium Series
Co-hosted with NSSC
Abstract:

Conventional approaches to radiation measurements are sometimes insufficient to address the challenges of nuclear threat detection in real-world conditions.  Threat-aware signal processing, statistical methods, machine learning, and artificial intelligence are fast becoming an important part of the analysis of large data sets acquired by radiation detectors and supporting contextual sensors. These computational methods enable us to unmask data correlations, trends, and patterns that provide valuable insights of the physics phenomena under study. The methods and insights can then be used to fuse data from different measurement modalities and analyze measurements with greatly enhanced performance.  This talk will describe some of the difficulties in nuclear threat detection and how machine learning can be applied to address these challenges.  Problems specific to applying machine learning to nuclear threat detection, some of which can be catastrophic, will be discussed, and solutions will be presented that can avoid these issues.  

About the Speaker:

Simon Labov is an expert in nuclear detection systems, advanced spectral and multisource analysis algorithms, and distributed detector systems.  He currently leads the development of the machine learning-enabled Enhanced Radiological Nuclear Inspection and Evaluation (ERNIE) System.  ERNIE is now operating at some of the busiest U.S. seaports to increase sensitivity and reduce false alarms for radiation portal monitors.  He also leads an algorithm development team for the ubiquitous detection SIGMA program and other mobile detection systems. In 2001, he initiated the Cellular-Telephone-Based Radiation Sensor and Wide-Area Detection Network Project, which was awarded three patents and has been aggressively supported by multiple funding agencies.  Simon Labov joined LLNL in 1987 and helped initiate a program to develop high-resolution, energy-dispersive x-ray detectors that operate at very low temperatures, and then founded and directed the LLNL Radiation Detection Center.  Prior to joining LLNL, Labov developed instrumentation for soft-x-ray astrophysics and received a B.S. at Stanford University and a Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley.

E.S. Kuh Chair of Engineering: Peter Hosemann

E.S. Kuh Chair of Engineering: Peter Hosemann

September 24th, 2020

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Professor and Department Chair Peter Hosemann was announced as the E.S. Kuh Chair of Engineering. This honor is granted to a faculty member with outstanding research, teaching, and service. The Chair, funded by the Hewlett Endowment, honors the memory of Prof. Ernest Kuh (1928-2015) of the EECS department, who served as Chair, and as the Dean of the UC Berkeley College of Engineering.
 
Ernest Kuh joined the EECS Department faculty in 1956. From 1968 to 1972 he served as chair of the department; from 1973 to 1980 he served as Dean of the College of Engineering. 

Prof. Kuh was a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Academia Sinica, and a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He was a Fellow of IEEE and AAAS. He received numerous awards and honors, including the ASEE Lamme Medal, the IEEE Centennial Medal, the IEEE Education Medal, the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Award, the IEEE Millennium Medal, the 1996 C&C Prize, and the 1998 EDAC Phil Kaufman Award.

Going From Zero to A Billion: How to Build an Advanced Nuclear Power Plant Indy Style

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SPEAKER:
CANON BRYAN
DATE/TIME:
MON, 08/31/2020 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
LOCATION:
Fall 2020 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

The nuclear energy industry is transforming from being highly concentrated and government- or multinational- funded to nimble, innovative start-ups funded by the cleantech community. This lecture discusses how it is possible to take an advanced reactor design from the idea stage to a multi-billion-dollar concern and still maintain control over your vision for the project.

About the Speaker:

Canon Bryan is a financial professional with over 25 years of experience in various aspects of the finance industry. Mr. Bryan has experience as a buy-side analyst, entrepreneur and financial executive. He co-founded and has been involved with the listing of two successful companies onto public stock exchanges in North America since 2004. He has contracted with many public and private companies, performing a wide variety of finance-related operations, including public company financial reporting, management reporting, full-cycle accounting, budget development and analysis, economic modeling, corporate development strategies, technical writing, project management, and others. He has had exposure to the following industries: nuclear power, natural resources, biotechnology, real estate development, food service and others. Mr. Bryan was a founding shareholder in the following companies: Terrestrial Energy Inc, since 2012, where he serves as chief financial officer, is developing a commercial molten salt reactor in Canada. NioCorp Developments Ltd (NB: TSXV) in October 2009. NioCorp is developing the largest niobium deposit in North America. Uranium Energy Corp (UEC: AMEX) in August 2004, where he served as VP Corporate Development until October 2007. UEC is a producer of ISR uranium in the USA. Mr. Bryan was a senior financial analyst for Lasik Vision Corporation (LSK: CDNX), which was the world’s largest provider of laser refractive surgical services. He has also served as chief financial officer, and on boards of directors, for private and public companies in Canada and the USA. Mr. Bryan completed his professional studies in accounting with the Certified General Accountants Association of Canada; he is not designated.

Zoom: https://berkeley.zoom.us/j/91568655249

Next-Generation Laser Plasma Spectroscopy Technologies for Nuclear Security

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SPEAKER:
VASSILIA ZORBA
DATE/TIME:
MON, 09/14/2020 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
LOCATION:
Zoom
Fall 2020 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

Pulsed laser technologies play a critical role in nuclear security, including remote sensing, safeguards and emergency response. My group’s research focuses on the development of next-generation laser technologies with improved sensitivity, precision, and detection range for nuclear non-proliferation applications. This talk will cover recent work on emerging ultrafast technologies based on optical emission. Specifically, I will discuss new femtosecond laser ablation sampling approaches that enable remote isotopic and elemental sensing, improve laser beam propagation at extended distances, and preferentially enhance or impede chemical reactions for the detection of isotopes. Enabling laser technologies include femtosecond filamentation, ultrafast optical vortex beams, and femtosecond-induced weakly ionized air plasma channels to optimize detection distance and sensitivity.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Vassilia Zorba is a Physicist Staff Scientist and Group Leader for the Laser Technologies Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. She is also an Associate Adjunct Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of California, Berkeley. Her research interests include ultrafast laser-material interactions, non-linear optics, remote sensing, laser-induced plasma chemistry, and laser ablation-based chemical analysis for nuclear security and energy applications. Her previous work focused on femtosecond laser surface structuring technologies and biomimetic material functionalization. Dr. Zorba’s credits include more than 70 publications in peer-reviewed journals, numerous invited talks, and a 2011 R&D 100 Technology Award.

Zoom Link: https://berkeley.zoom.us/j/91568655249

The Transformational Challenge Reactor

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SPEAKER:
KURT TERRANI, Ph.D.
DATE/TIME:
MON, 08/31/2020 - 4:00PM TO 5:00PM
LOCATION:
Zoom
Fall 2020 Colloquium Series
Abstract:

This talk provides and overview of motivation behind and ongoing activities towards development and deployment of the Transformational Challenge Reactor (TCR)

About the Speaker:
Kurt Terrani is a Senior Staff Scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Director of Transformational Challenge Reactor program for U.S. DOE, Office of Nuclear Energy. He joined the laboratory as a Weinberg Fellow in the Nuclear Fuel Materials Group in 2010 after completing his Ph.D. in nuclear engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on fundamental aspects of nuclear fuel and materials manufacturing, radiation effects, and behavior.

THE FUTURE OF NUCLEAR ENERGY: Interview with Peter Hosemann

The Future of Nuclear Energy: Interview with Peter Hosemann

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If you get cancer treatment today, it’s very likely you will get injected with a radioactive substance. That technology is born out of the nuclear enterprise. Without reactors, you wouldn’t have it. There are numerous examples of the benefits of nuclear engineering beyond just nuclear power.
Dr. Peter Hosemann, Professor in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at University of California, Berkeley

In 2000, nuclear energy from just 30 countries provided approximately 15 percent of worldwide electricity capacity. But by 2019, its share had fallen to 10 percent, with the International Energy Agency (IEA) predicting that without intervention it would fall even further, to 5 percent, by 2040. That represents a significant drop in what could be an important source of clean energy.

“A nuclear power plant doesn’t take up a lot of space, and it can create a tremendous amount of energy, with a carbon footprint that is extremely low,” says Dr. Peter Hosemann, a professor in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at University of California Berkeley, where he is also the current chair.

Nuclear energy is the second-largest low-carbon power source in the world, second only to hydropower. According to the IEA, low-carbon electricity generation has to increase to 85 percent of the world’s energy, from its 36 percent share today, in order to stave off the most calamitous effects of climate change. Of major low-carbon energy sources, nuclear power is the least dependent upon geography.

“I believe the use of nuclear energy will increase as we become more serious about climate change and carbon emission,” Dr. Hosemann says. “I don’t think we have much of a choice.”

Dr. Peter Hosemann is a professor in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of California Berkeley, where he is also the department chair. He received his MS and PhD degrees in material science from Montanuniversität Leoben, Austria.

Prior to joining the Department of Nuclear Engineering at UC Berkeley, Dr. Hosemann was a graduate research assistant and a post-doc at Los Alamos National Laboratory. His research features experimental material science for nuclear applications, with a focus on the structural materials used for nuclear components.

Source: https://www.onlineengineeringprograms.com/features/nuclear-energy-future

 

MRS Graduate Student Awards

MRS Graduate Student Awards

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Yujun Xie, who is now a postdoctoral fellow at Prof. Peter Hosemann’s group at the University of California at Berkeley and National Center for Electron Microscopy in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has won the prestigious gold graduate student award from the 2020 Materials Research Society Spring Meeting for his Ph.D. work at Yale University working with Prof. Judy Cha and Prof. Jan Schroers.
MRS Graduate Student Awards are intended to honor and encourage graduate students whose academic achievements and current materials science research display a high level of excellence and distinction. MRS seeks to recognize students of exceptional ability who show promise for significant future achievement in materials research and education. Yujun was selected as one of 19 finalists and gave an invited competition talk. His presentation titled "Atomistic Understanding of Crystallization Principles in Atomistic Understanding of Crystallization Principles for Additive Manufacturing" was selected as one of the 7 students to receive the Gold Award among the finalists.
One focus of Xie's research is developing predictable outcomes in crystallization when working on the nanoscale.
“My work aims to develop accurate crystallization models beyond conventional theories and enable precise control of the microstructures of the structural alloys over a wide range of length scales from Ångström to micrometer using advanced analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques at unprecedented time and spatial resolution,” said Xie, who is now working with Prof. Peter Hosemann on learning the failure mechanism of composite materials in extreme
environments.
For more information, click here.